Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Annual Conference’ Category

By Brad Sekulich

A career in study abroad was not on my radar when I was an undergraduate student, or even for some time after that. The path that has brought me to the field of education abroad–my chosen field for almost 20 years now–has been very interesting and one I never would have anticipated.

The financial need for a job while working on a PhD led me to take my first job in international education at Texas Tech University. I was their first full-time study abroad advisor and left after a year to become the first full-time study abroad coordinator at University of Texas-Arlington. It’s important to note that I was the first full-timer at these institutions, serving in positions that are now very common. It says a lot about the field’s development in the past two decades. It really is impressive to see the growth of opportunities in education abroad, mostly because it means there is more need for our services. The American mindset is globalizing, albeit more slowly than for most of our liking.

As the field has evolved in the past two decades, so too have the ways we enter it, work in it, and promote it. Now many, if not most, folks working in or wanting to work in education abroad do so intentionally and with quite a bit of forethought.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

By Tiffany Harrison and Kayla Patterson

With the NAFSA annual conference just around the corner, we’d like to talk about the importance of getting social. More specifically, we’re referring to the use of social media to enhance your career and professional development. As we’ve stated previously, merging your offline and online networking together is integral to how you market yourself. To give you a better sense as to why your online profile has become increasingly valuable, we’re covering some of the key questions we’ve received as social media advocates, and discussing what it means for you as an international educator.

Why is social media so important for career development?

Social media is important for career development because it’s such a powerful form of networking. As is inherent in the term “social networks,” channels like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and even Instagram have become the places to build a network of friends, fans, followers, connections, or whatever else you’d like to call them! Networking is key to career and professional development. The connections you make on social media could help you get a new job, find a mentor, learn more about your industry, support a career change, and more.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

By Michele Friedmann

As you plan for your trip to Denver and start packing, please consider the following tips and suggestions. The sky in Denver is bluer, the air is thinner and dryer, and alcohol is gong to hit you much harder! But don’t let the high altitude scare you. As long as you come prepared, you’ll be able to fully enjoy your week in Denver!

Denver is nicknamed the Mile High City because its official elevation is exactly one mile (5,280 feet) above sea level, making it one of the highest major cities in the United States! In fact, the 11th step on the state capitol building is labeled “One Mile Above Sea Level.” It was discovered in 2002 that Denver is actually 3 feet higher than previously thought so there’s some debate over whether the correct step. is marked But whether it’s the 11th step or another, either way there’s one step that sits at exactly 5,280 feet!

Altitude Effects

Interested in improving your golf score? You’re in luck! In Denver, golf balls go 10 percent farther due to the low air density. The effects are similar in baseball—fly balls typically transfer 5 percent farther at Coors Field than at Fenway. In this rarified air, cocktails go much further too. Alcoholic beverages hit you much harder at high altitudes than at sea level. It’s highly recommended that you take it easy on alcohol. If you don’t, you’ll certainly feel it the next day. Trust me on this one.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

By Patricia Jones

When I got my first business card, I was so excited. Here at last was proof that I was a recognized professional in a position of authority in international education. I could exchange it with my peers, provide it to my students, and present it to individuals from around the world. This was validation of who I was.

For years, I carried it proudly in my card case. It was a part of my personal identification. But then came the day that it no longer defined me. I was retiring.

Many of us look forward to the day when we don’t have to get up early in the morning, dress for work, and do our jobs all day. However, as we close in on that rite of passage known as “retirement,” we often have concerns about how we will adjust. What will we do with our time? How will we replace the interactions with our colleagues? Will we still grow intellectually? Our lives are so filled with individuals we serve, people we nurture, and cross-cultural experiences we share that we are not sure about the whole process of moving into this new world of unknowns.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

By Michele Friedmann

You may need to extend your trip by a week or two to enjoy just a handful of the many fun things to do in the Mile High City! There’s a reason Colorado was voted the 4th happiest state in the United States—adventure and unbeatable weather await you every day. From hiking and biking trails, to exciting sporting events, and a growing culture, music, and art scene, there’s a lot to experience during your visit to Denver!

Rockies Game

Fortunately for baseball fans attending the NAFSA conference, the Rockies have quite a few home games during the week of conference. Even if you’re not a fan, it’s fun to see the ballpark and be a part of the energetic vibes. Coors Field is located in lower downtown, surrounded by fun bars and restaurants. You can purchase general admission tickets starting at $14, which include $6 in concession or merchandise credit and access to seating near The Rooftop, a fun bar and hangout spot.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

By Katherine Punteney

The Forum on Education Abroad reports that 87 percent of its members hold a master’s degree or higher, and the Association for International Education Administrators found that 81 percent of senior international officers hold doctoral degrees. It seems like everyone you have met has told you that you need a graduate degree to move up in the field. So you decide to take the plunge and apply for a graduate degree program in international education. The dilemma now is choosing the right program. How can you tell what the program will be like and what it can offer you?

The first key decision to make is whether you want a more theoretical, research-based curriculum or a more applied curriculum. At the doctoral level, this is typified by the choice between the PhD and EdD. In the United States, the doctor of philosophy (PhD) degree typically takes six years to complete, and, as the name suggests, is often theoretical in focus. Following approximately two years of full-time course work, including courses on research methodology, the PhD student will embark on three to five years of research to carry out and complete a dissertation. The emphasis is on creating new understandings of phenomena in international education through research, with recommendations for practice.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

The Expo Soundstage at the NAFSA Annual Conference & Expo is hard to miss.

Last year’s inaugural Soundstage kicked off with the booming sounds of ShinDaiko’s traditional Japanese drumming. The experience continued throughout the week with Boston musicians serenading the audience with Irish folk tunes; Johnson & Wales University hosting a lively round of “SharkFest,” a Shark Tank®-style event for international educators; and a fascinating exploration of some Boston history with the city’s Archeological Department.

This year, the NAFSA Soundstage has increased in both scope and volume. With more 30 presentations scheduled over the course of the week, the Soundstage will be delivering a variety of interesting and engaging programming, from a series of short films created by international students and professionals to a demonstration of a cloud-based English language assessment system.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

By Michele Friedmann

Denver has a well-deserved reputation of being the Napa Valley of craft beer. Every neighborhood has a thriving bar scene and you’re certain to find a local wine, spirit, or craft beer that will make you want to return for more! Each local has his or her own top happy hour selections and there are too many to list in a single blog post! You’ll find my favorites below, but I encourage you to explore during your time in Denver and fill me on any secret spots you stumble upon!

Downtown

The Wynkoop Brewing Company is known for its delicious local brews and famous founder, Governor John Hickenlooper. It was the first brewpub to open in historic downtown Denver after the end of Prohibition! At Wynkoop, you can enjoy live comedy in the basement or play pool upstairs – there are bars on both levels. On Monday-Friday from 3:00 p.m.-6:00p.m., you can enjoy great happy hour- specials: $3.50 on select beers and $4 for food specials. Complimentary brewery tours are available Tuesday through Saturday at 3:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

By Mandy Hansen

I asked my colleagues and session attendees the following question: “What is one challenge that you’ve had, as a woman, in navigating your professional life?”

A few of the replies include:

  • Confined to one role, locked in and not supported;
  • Balancing being assertive and being perceived as “bossy”;
  • Trouble being heard and taken seriously;
  • Being a woman of color and not having someone to look up to and be a mentor; and
  • Lack of understanding of the work done: it’s viewed as “fun” and anyone can do it.

Renditions of these replies are repeated even though the audience shifts from state to state. I’ve done three different sessions on the topic of women and leadership in three different states over the past eight months, and certain themes emerge that turn a solitary experience into one that is shared among others in the room. The goal of these sessions is to open up the dialogue and validate the experiences of women.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

By Samantha Martin

Is international education experiencing a creativity crisis?

My team and I have been on a “listening tour” of sorts with international educators and students for the past 2 years as we build new human-centered software for education abroad. In that time, I’ve been quite struck by the overwhelming sentiment from international educators at all levels that there’s very little room for creativity in higher education today.

This is a problem. We need our highly educated, well-traveled, multilingual international education workforce to unleash their creative minds on very real and complex problems.

Where are we missing the mark?

For starters, I think many of us imagine that creativity is a special experience reserved for artists and designers. We forget that creativity is solving problems in a new way within the confines of meaningful limitations. The more complex the problem or set of problems, the greater the need for creativity. Viewed this way, international education is a field that requires a lot of creativity to solve problems for stakeholders operating within different linguistic and cultural constructs across multiple timezones.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,137 other followers

%d bloggers like this: