Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Careers’ Category

ashley glennAshley Glenn
It was my first time to the NAFSA annual conference, also my first year in the field, and I traveled to San Diego alone.

Attending NAFSA can be overwhelming in the way family reunions show how far your family name extends and how few people you know. Not knowing anyone, it is tempting to stand at the edge of the room, walking in only for hors d’oeuvres (which I did at one of the receptions).

My first time at NAFSA, I was determined to get involved. For this to happen, I needed a plan, a master list. Many boxes would need to be checked. A few weeks after the conference program arrived, I decided to start the process. This would require an Americano and a few hours of reading through session descriptions, poster topics, volunteer options, and more. Similar to planning a trip, I needed to think strategically to make the most of my time.

This moment of strategy arrived when I saw that the Career Center would be offering a case-study challenge. This was the fulcrum by which to focus my week. I now had a conference conversation starter—”have you heard of the case study challenge?”

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Mitch GordonBy Mitch Gordon

Let’s set the stage: You have received an e-mail/phone call inviting you to interview with the international education organization of your dreams. While an accomplishment, the most important part is yet to come. You’re feeling understandably nervous; you want to prepare for the interview and put your best foot forward. While not a comprehensive list by any means, I hope the advice below will inspire you to be your best self and ace your interview. Good luck!

Ask Good Questions During Your Interview
Asking good questions is one of the best ways to make a lasting impression. The right questions demonstrate that you understand the business and reflect an ability to think critically. What, you may be asking, qualifies as a good question? That’s a good question in and of itself! I’d place interview questions into two broad categories. First, questions you can prepare for. Second, questions that arise from the interview itself. In the first category, ask questions that show you understand the position you’re applying for and that provide insight into long-term business goals.

For example: “What do you hope the person in this position will achieve over the next two years?” The best thing you can do is research the organization in a genuine, interested way. As you research, ask yourself what it would take to do amazingly well at the job you’re applying for. Excellent questions will naturally emerge from that type of introspection.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

By Ellen H. Badger and Shawna Szabo

Did you miss our earlier blog post, “How to Use Networking and Informational Interviews to Start a Career, Further a Career, or Change a Career?” You’ll find it here .

As we mentioned in that post, informational interviews can lead to a “foot in the door” when it comes to starting or advancing a career in international education. Now we reveal five tips for a successful informational interview.

  • Do your research regarding the person with whom you’ll meet. A quick Google search can give you some great conversation starters about their past publications or presentations in the field.
  • Dress to impress. This may not be a formal job interview but you want to be sure to make a good impression.
  • (more…)

Read Full Post »

Mitch GordonBy Mitch Gordon

Interested in finding a job in international education? You’re not alone. Finding a job in international education can be incredibly competitive. That fact may be surprising when you consider this: The tangible benefits aren’t very impressive. You should expect a modest salary and benefits, limited opportunities for advancement, and sometimes long working hours and travel. Why, you may ask, are these positions in such high demand? Because you’ll be doing meaningful, rewarding work that has a real impact on real people. With the above in mind, how can you make your goal a reality and find a job in international education?

In applying for a job, there’s no perfect formula. However, there are some best practices to follow that will help your application stand out from the crowd, increase your chances of getting an interview, and ultimately boost your chance of receiving a coveted job offer.

Start Your Search Before You Need the Job
The worst time to look for a job is when you really, really need one. Start now. How? It’s a lot easier than you might think. People in the world of international education are an extremely friendly, passionate group. Get to know them better. Form relationships with people at organizations and companies you respect.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

By Bob Ericksen

The trickiest part of figuring out if you are “management material” is being honest enough with yourself to determine your readiness. I asked someone the “are you ready?” question last year at the conference and the response was “I deserve it! I’ve had this job for 11 years!” Sorry, wrong answer.

For sure, time and experience are key factors in developing good managers. More than that, however, good managers share skill-sets, attitudes, and world-views that provide them with the leadership skills necessary for success. Key among those is what I’d call “‘Big picture’ thinking.” Today’s blog post will focus on this area, along with tips for building this skill right here at the conference.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

By Vera V. Chapman, PhD, and Marty Tillman

On campuses, increasing attention is being placed on the initial decision-making process that students undergo as they study abroad, as well as the ongoing process of self-reflection about what they are learning while abroad. We see this heightened concern as an outcome of the soft economy and the need of many students to directly link learning outcomes of their international experiences to their marketability as applicants in the job search. Another contributing factor is increased attention to standards of good practice in the overall design and implementation of study abroad programs. The result is that many campuses are faced with the question of how to best strengthen the advising processes for students who study abroad.

Campuses provide an uneven continuum of support to assist students in the “unpacking” (or sense-making) of their study abroad experiences after they return to campus. Sometimes it is an online self-assessment tool; sometimes it involves a voluntary debriefing seminar; at other times, it may involve mandatory participation in a one-credit course as requirement for participation in a campus-designed program. It is rare to find a campus with a fully integrated approach to advising, reflection, and unpacking, though there are a few examples of best practices. One of the best models in the country is in place at the University of Minnesota Learning Abroad Center; the Center is hosting a Career Integration Conference in July 2014.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

By Carin Usrey

While I officially work as a university career counselor, I frequently find myself taking on the role of a marketing specialist, continually revamping outreach efforts to increase student awareness of our office’s services and drive up attendance at our campus programs and events. Regardless of how valuable, practical, and arguably necessary our office’s services might be, it is a constant struggle to convince students of our ongoing relevance and even more of a challenge to embed ourselves into the culture of a student’s college experience.

As a passionate advocate of education abroad and an avid supporter of integrating global experiences into college life, I know that global education professionals are faced with similar challenges. Offering what most universities currently value as an elective service, there is an additional barrier of persuading students to see the added value of an optional study abroad experience, not to mention the extra work of validating its financial and academic feasibility.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

This post shares thoughts about the importance of communicating with international students. Learning early on allows you to develop lifelong skills that will help future career endeavors working with International students.

By Tonyia Stewart

As international admissions coordinator for Clemson University, I receive many phone calls and e-mails every day with questions and concerns about applications, decisions, and test scores. Students often stop by to drop off final official transcripts and have questions about conditional acceptance and their transcripts. Having a professional background in long-term care and marketing, I have developed strong communication skills. Even with these skills, I never realized how much I would struggle with answering simple questions until I began working in international education. The communication skills I learned in my previous positions were a good foundation, but I had to learn more in order to be successful in my new role.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

By Andy Fraher & John Wilkerson

“We’d like to invite our business class cabin to board now. We’ll begin our general boarding process in just a few minutes; please wait for your zone number to be called before approaching the boarding gate.”

Does this announcement leave you feeling anxious and stressed out? How about angry that, in our society, class distinctions still exist? Are you preparing to throw elbows with the rest of the masses to ensure that you can get to your cramped seat and have space to store your carry-on in the overhead bin?

Your reaction likely depends on a number of things, including your comfort level with large groups, your ability to pack items efficiently, and your level of zen in trusting that the airline will deliver you and your belongings to the appropriate place in a reasonable amount of time. As you travel more often, you may even become one of the lucky few who get to board early due to your mileage-based upgrade to business class!

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Mike SmitheeBy Michael Smithee

If you are like me, you have spent your professional life discovering how truly broad the field of international education is. You have developed a fount of knowledge and impressive skills, and likely you do not want to retreat into a shell. (Maybe you want to disengage for a short period of time.)

As you consider your next move, you may find yourself attracted to adventure, or perhaps you will be a searcher for new options, or someone who just lets the day unfold. For myself, I am someone who wanted to continue using my knowledge, skills, and interests in international education. There are many avenues of approach to staying involved: I have three categories.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 848 other followers

%d bloggers like this: